Category Archives: Tax Credits


State Tax Credit Exchange Sponsors Heroes for HOPE

Written by: on November 19, 2015

Few charitable groups have been serving their community for well over a century, but HOPE Atlanta has done just that. The 115-year-old organization doesn’t have a superstar celebrity attached to it or a worldwide presence, but for those in Atlanta who know their work, they enthusiastically participate in their annual fundraising efforts, the Heroes for Hope event.

What began as part of the Traveler’s Aid movement, has become a powerful resource in Atlanta that continues to stretch to accommodate as many as possible. In the early part of its inception, volunteers would wait at train stations to offer help, especially to the most vulnerable.

“HOPE Atlanta does remarkable work,” says Kady DeWees, Business Development Director for State Tax Credit Exchange (STCE), a sponsor of this year’s event. “As a single mother, I was especially moved by the stories and photos of families who could turn to HOPE for shelter and services when they felt they were at the end of their rope.”

State Tax Credit Exchange employees understand the impact of the services HOPE Atlanta provides. For more than a decade, the company has worked to bring investors to affordable housing projects in several states.

“The need for affordable housing affects every demographic,” adds DeWees. “For young families, single parents, retirees and those struggling to get their lives on track, the issue represents a challenge for thousands of Americans each year. I am proud to work for a firm that uses its resources to support the creation of affordable and hospitable communities for citizens like those HOPE Atlanta serves.  Having a home a person can be proud of and feel safe in really DOES give hope that everyone needs.”

HOPE Atlanta assisted over two thousand individuals last year.  No longer exclusive to the train station, the group’s Airport Outreach Team works to engage homeless persons at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson airport, offering services from “transportation to alternative housing solutions including shelters, treatment programs, transitional and permanent housing programs.”

Other programs include helping homeless individuals gain permanent housing by providing security deposits and utilities charges; assisting with transportation and resettlement services for women affected by domestic violence; and providing emergency shelter for homeless families when shelter space is not available. According to their website, “HOPE Atlanta placed 518 homeless adults and 223 children in emergency shelters, affording them an opportunity get off the streets and seek stable housing.”

To learn more about additional programs including help for veterans, visit HOPE Atlanta online at

State Tax Credit Exchange invests in projects which qualify for federal and state tax credits and passes the benefits of those credits on to taxpayers through investment programs.

STCE invests in solar, historic, mill, abandoned building, and low income housing projects, working with insurance companies, corporations and high net worth individuals to deliver profitable investment opportunities that are good for all. Since its inception in 2005, STCE has invested in over 200 projects and delivered more than $150m of funding to government incentivized projects in about a dozen states in the US and Puerto Rico.


Renewable Energy Tax Credits

What should states be doing to increase electric car sales? (Report)

Written by: on November 7, 2015

A new report entitled Charging Up compiled by the Sierra Club and its partners, the Conservation Law Foundation and Acadia Center, finds that when it comes to promoting electric car growth in the US, many states have promised much but delivered little. In particular, the states in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions have fallen far behind their goals. For example, the six New England states have a combined goal of 1.7 million electric cars on their roads by the end of 2015, yet only 30,000 such vehicles are presently registered in the region. That’s a dismal performance.

Gina Coplon-Newfield, director of the Sierra Club’s EV program, says in the report, “Plug-in electric vehicles are a clean, affordable choice over the gasoline- fueled vehicles that are making our air dirty and our families and our climate sick. We need the utility industry, auto industry, and government in each and every state to dramatically increase policies that encourage electric vehicle use, and this report shows how we can do just that.”

The report lists 9 steps the Club recommends that manufacturers, state governments and auto dealers take to increase the number of electric vehicle sales in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions of the country:

  1. High-level task forces or commissions to provide state-level leadership and coordination.
  2. Consumer incentives to make EVs less expensive and more convenient.
  3. Programs to make EVs more accessible to low-income residents.
  4. Utility programs and investments that incentivize EV adoption as part of a modernized grid.
  5. Policies to promote widespread availability of consumer-friendly charging stations.
  6. State and local governments lead by example by integrating EVs into their fleets and other programs.
  7. Increased efforts by automakers to manufacture EVs that appeal to a broad range of consumers, and to market and sell them aggressively in and beyond California.
  8. Auto dealership programs that promote EVs.
  9. Public education and outreach to ensure the vast majority of consumers view EVs as a viable and desirable option.

All are good recommendations, of course, but many have political implications that will make them controversial. Not everyone is in favor of government incentives, an issue that will become prominent in the US a year from now when the current federal $7,500 tax credit is ready to expire, a new US president will be elected and a deeply fractured Congress has to decide what incentives, if any, should be put in place to replace the federal tax credit.

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Federal Budget Obama signs 2-year budget, debt deal before default deadline

Written by: on November 4, 2015

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama on Monday signed into law a bipartisan budget bill that avoids a catastrophic U.S. default and puts off the next round of fighting over federal spending and debt until after next year’s presidential and congressional elections.

Obama praised the rare bipartisan cooperation behind the deal, saying that 2-year agreement that funds the government through the 2017 fiscal year puts the government on a responsible path.

It should finally free us from the cycle of shutdown threats and last-minute fixes and allows us to, therefore, plan for the future,” Obama said in brief remarks as he signed the bill.

Tuesday was the deadline for averting a default on U.S. financial obligations by raising the debt limit.

The Senate gave final approval to the House-passed bill late last week and sent it to Obama. He signed it in the Oval Office, shortly before departing on a day trip to New Jersey and New York to focus on the criminal justice system, as well as raise money for his fellow Democrats.

The legislation raises the limit on the government’s debt through March 2017, pushing reconsideration of what in recent years has become a contentious issue until after the elections for the White House and Congress in November 2016.

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DELAWAREONLINE.COM: Historic church complex set to continue ‘Lord’s work’

Written by: on November 1, 2015

robin brown, The News Journal 7:14 p.m. EDT October 23, 2015

WILMINGTON The fate of a landmark church complex, historic and massive, but long vacant, is a mystery no more.

After years facing an uncertain future including possible sale for shopping development, the Cathedral Church of St. John at North Market Street and Concord Avenue, will continue to host the Lord’s work.

So say leaders of the Episcopal Diocese of Delaware that owns the site, the Ministry of Caring that is acquiring it and folks in the Brandywine Village neighborhood, where worries grew during its continued vacancy that a bad decision about its future could have been disastrous for the community.

The Ministry of Caring, a nonprofit known for its Emmanuel Dining Room network to feed the needy, plans to convert the stately stone church and office building into much-needed housing for moderate- and lower-income elderly residents.

“The sacredness of this place, which gave honor and glory to God, will continue to serve Him in its ministry to the poor,” said the Right Rev. Wayne P. Wright, bishop of the statewide diocese.

“We see this as a great use for this facility and a way to continue serving the needs of the community,” he said. “We’re very happy about it.”

Gov. Jack Markell praised the project, saying Ministry of Caring founder and executive director Brother Ronald Giannone has “made a powerful case” for the plan’s ability to serve the needs of moderate- and lower-income seniors.

The plan would change the land’s use for the first time in centuries.

“It’s going to be a very challenging project,” Giannone said.

He aims to apply next summer for Low Income Housing Tax Credit Equity funds of about $4.8 million and $2.65 million in housing development funds through the Delaware State Housing Authority. Also projected are historic tax credit equity funds, equal to 30 percent of gross expenses paid at a project’s end, of roughly $1.4 million from the federal government and nearly $1.9 million from the state. Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control is expected to cover the $625,000 for environmental abatement through its Brownfield Program.

In addition to Longwood Foundation funds to buy the site, Giannone lists $200,000 from the Welfare Foundation, $300,000 received from JPMorgan Chase with that much more expected, and $90,000 from TD Bank.

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Susan Kluttz

Kluttz wins award for historic tax credit work

Written by: on October 4, 2015

Published 12:10 am Tuesday, September 29, 2015

With North Carolina’s historic tax credit firmly in place, Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz received formal recognition this weekend for a statewide tour spanning more than 50 cities.

The North Carolina branch of the American Institute of Architecture this weekend presented Kluttz its Legacy award for her successful effort to renew the state’s historic tax credit, which expired in 2014. North Carolina’s recently passed budget includes a lesser version of the tax credit. For income-producing properties, it includes 15 percent credit for up to $10 million in expenditures and 10 percent credit for expenditures between $10 million and $20 million.

In order to revitalize the credit, former Salisbury mayor Kluttz toured the state. Gov. Pat McCrory joined her on several stops, including Salisbury. In connection with the award presentation, Executive Vice President of the NC AIA David Crawford said Kluttz’s work made “a huge difference to the architectural community.”

Kluttz said she was honored to have received the award, but shifted credit to McCrory, legislators who supported historic tax credits and the community and professional groups who advocated for the tax credit. She said media organizations also played a role in renewing the historic tax credit. Kluttz said she was “preaching to the choir during many of her tour stops.” The media helped spread Kluttz’s message to others who weren’t familiar or didn’t agree with tax credits, she said.

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Education Tax Credits

New Tax Credits benefit Businesses who Educate Workers

Written by: on September 19, 2015

VALDOSTA — Georgia employers can now take advantage of new tax credits when they support employees’ successful completion of a General Educational Development (GED®) test. The Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) will work with businesses in the state to promote the participation and success of employee GED® attainment.

“Nearly 18 percent of Georgia’s adult population has less than a high school education,” said Commissioner Gretchen Corbin. “Thanks to this unique opportunity passed by the Georgia General Assembly, we are one step closer to fulfilling Gov. Deal’s goal of full literacy in Georgia, while preparing Georgia businesses to compete in a global economy.”

Employers can take advantage of the tax credit in either of two ways. An employer can earn a tax credit of $1,200 per employee if that worker is compensated, at his/her normal rate of pay, for completing a 40-hour class and passing the GED® Test. The class must be a Basic Skills Education class approved by the Technical College System of Georgia, and can either be part of an existing program or a unique program established by the employer. In both cases, a minimum of 40 hours of instruction is required.

A second option would award a $400 tax credit to an employer when a worker takes and passes a GED® Test paid for by that employer.

An employee can be included in only one of the tax credit categories, not both. An employer can earn tax credits of up to $100,000 per year for supporting employees in their achievement of a GED®.

“We want every adult employee in Georgia to acquire the necessary basic skills to be successful their workplace,” said TCSG Assistant Commissioner for Adult Education Beverly Smith. “In doing so, we make Georgia’s businesses stronger, which in turn, makes Georgia stronger.”

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Tax incentive program helps businesses

Written by: on September 15, 2015

By Gina Conn
September 12,2015
Across the state, more than $2 million has been allocated in tax incentives for downtown and village center construction and rehabilitation projects.

Montpelier received $128,422 to help finance the 1 Taylor St. project, in the form of a sales tax reallocation.

“It’s a pretty significant contribution to help fill the gap for that project,” said Montpelier Mayor John Hollar.

The project includes the redevelopment of a downtown parking lot for a new multimodal transit center and 42 units of housing. Its total cost is $5.88 million.

Gov. Peter Shumlin announced the recipients Wednesday at a ceremony in Winooski.

“When we put state dollars to work revitalizing our communities, we not only support local economic development, but we also build a better and stronger future for Vermont,” Shumlin said in a news release.

Several other central Vermont projects are receiving funding:

— Another Way, at 125 Barre St. in Montpelier, is a social service nonprofit providing advocacy, information, referrals, access to housing resources, peer support, supported employment and education. Major work to address safety, code and accessibility improvements in its facility will be aided by the award of $85,525 in state tax credits. The total project is expected to cost $995,000.

— In Barre, 18 West St., which used to be office space but has been unoccupied for several years, will be converted into an apartment unit. The project received $2,925 in tax credits. The cost of the renovation is estimated at $30,000.

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Our View: Lawmakers should pass bill extending Historic River’s Edge Tax Credits

Written by: on September 11, 2015

By The Editorial Board
Rockford Register Star
Posted Sep. 6, 2015 at 5:09 PM

Historic River’s Edge Tax Credits have spurred growth in downtown Rockford. But if the law is allowed to expire at the end of 2016 that growth could stall. Senate Bill 1642 would extend these credits beyond 2016, and we urge the General Assembly to pass it and Gov. Bruce Rauner to sign it.

On April 26, the Editorial Board wrote about the importance of renewing Illinois’ Historic River’s Edge Tax Credit to downtown Rockford’s exciting rebirth. The five-year tax credit program is scheduled to expire at the end of 2016. Senate Bill 1642, sponsored by Sen. Steve Stadelman, D-Rockford and co-sponsored by Sen. Dave Syverson, R-Rockford, would extend the credit. We urged its passage. However, no votes have been taken on the bill.

The law that created the tax credit had a five-year sunset clause. It will expire at the end of 2016 unless the General Assembly passes and Gov. Bruce Rauner signs SB1642, which would extend the availability until the end of 2021.

The enthusiasm in downtown Rockford is palpable. As we wrote in April, “that’s partly because a new generation of urban pioneers aren’t turned off by the idea of living, working and playing downtown, as their suburb-seeking parents and grandparents were. People in many cities are increasingly living in lofts, shopping in attractive new boutiques, art galleries and dining fascinating restaurants that feature a wide variety of cuisines.” But the expiration of the historic tax credit could stall downtown’s growth here and in four other cities. Nothing has changed since the first editorial, so here is most of it again, for lawmakers who need a refresher course:

The 25 percent tax credit has poured life into buildings that would have remained vacant until they fell down. That’s why Mayor Larry Morrissey and his counterparts in Peoria, Aurora, Elgin and East St. Louis are urging the General Assembly to pass SB1642, which would extend the program for five more years.

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Texas tax credits

North Texas city hopes to remove barriers to homes

Written by: on August 7, 2015

Millennium opened this spring west of U.S. 75. It’s the fruit of a settlement between the city’s housing authority and a nonprofit that said the community was segregating minorities to the east. A similar complex, also on the west side, will come online less than 3 miles down the road.

But even then, it’s not enough to keep up with people streaming into the county.

“All of these employers certainly have to have people to work in their businesses,” Roslyn Miller, executive director of the McKinney Housing Authority,

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Sante Fe, NM: Bill Would Give Tribes Renewable Energy Tax Credits

Written by: on July 21, 2015

July 14, 2015

SANTA FE, N.M. – U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich of New Mexico is sponsoring legislation to amend the federal tax code to give Native American tribes – some of which are also known as Pueblo in New Mexico – tax credits for renewable energy projects.

Heinrich says the Tribal Tax Incentive for Renewable Energy Act would make tribes eligible for tax credits already available to non-tribal businesses.

It would allow tribal governments to take advantage of the existing 30 percent tax credit in the same way any private developer already can,” he says
According to Heinrich, an increasing number of Pueblos and tribes in New Mexico and elsewhere are interested in renewable energy, in part because the economic growth it can generate for a community is “huge.”